Tag: CSR

SAP’s 2010 Sustainability Report demo’d

I had a Skype chat recently with SAP’s Chief Sustainability Officer Peter Graf where he gave me a demo of their new 2010 Sustainability report.

With Peter’s permission, I recorded the demo for publication on YouTube. The video above is the result and the transcription is below.

Some highlights Peter mentioned include:

  1. Sustainability reporting has saved SAP €170 million (!),
  2. SAP are updating their Sustainability report quarterly and are embedding it more and more closely with their financial reporting and,
  3. SAP have deep social media embedding in their report

With this report, SAP have put clear blue water between themselves and any other sustainability report. SAP can still take it up another few notches (productising it, putting an api in front of it, publishing in xbrl, etc) but this is the kind of reporting everyone needs to be moving to, as a baseline. Kudos to SAP for once again setting the bar with this report.

Now here’s the transcription of the demo:

Tom Raftery: Hi, everyone. Welcome to GreekMonk TV. We are talking today to SAP’s Chief Sustainability Officer, Peter Graf, who is going to give us a quick demo of the new 2010 SAP Sustainability Report.

Peter Graf: So, this is SAP’s 2010 Sustainability Report, which people can find online at sapsustainabilityreport.com. The report lays out the three key areas of impact for SAP. In the first place, SAP wants to become a more sustainable company, so we are talking about our own sustainability performance. The second section of the report is about how SAP helps customers to run more profitably and sustainably, so that’s mostly a conversation about our applications and software solutions.

And then finally, there is a section on how people at SAP drive opportunity for others through IT. And then, certainly the last part, as always when we put our report on the line is that encouraging into action and dialog between us and those who come and visit the report. And we call that section Do Your Part and that describes how everyone can contribute.

Tom Raftery: Great. Can you show me some of the details of how SAP have done in the last year? How does it look onscreen, because it’s very different from any other sustainability report that’s out there?

Peter Graf: Exactly. So before we go there, the data that we talk about is all assured by KPMG, and there are two levels of assurance and yes, this report is A+ from GRI perspective. It’s got the best rating that you can get from GRI. It complies with a whole variety of standards, but most importantly, we have not only done limited assurance to our greenhouse gas numbers, we’ve actually gone for reasonable assurance, meaning the assurance company actually assures that this is really our footprint. And we do that because we believe in the future there will be much more scrutiny around how people are reporting greenhouse gas emissions.

And that’s what the greenhouse gas emissions look like. You can see the trend from 2000 to 2007; we’ve always increased our emissions. In 2007, we set ourselves the goal to reduce our emissions step-by-step back to the level of 2000 by the year 2020, so we have an absolute carbon target. That is pretty aggressive considering that in 2000, we had about 24,000 employees and already today in 2011, we have more than 50,000 employees and we want to obviously continue to grow as a company.

You can also see that we have kind of flipped the chart to kind of visually highlight that emissions are seen as a liability to SAP so they show below the line.

Tom Raftery: And clicking on any of those bars redraws the kind of pie chart on the right?

Peter Graf: Exactly, so you can go and drill into the different years and you can see how the emissions change. For example in 2008, we had 31% of our emissions from flights that also tells you that we include Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions in our calculation.

That number dropped dramatically in 2009, given that in the times of economic crisis, we just don’t service as many customers, so you can see that here. And then in 2010, the number continues in absolute terms to be reduced, which is amazing given that we have actually increased our revenues by 17% in 2010 while reducing our emissions. You can see that very nicely when you look at the carbon emissions on a Euro basis. We are now at 33.9 grams per Euro revenue and in 2008, that number was 45.6 grams.

So, in terms of carbon efficiency we have dramatically accelerated and you can drill into different areas. For example, revenue in the Americas, you can actually go and look at different scopes and include or exclude them in the competition. So that’s the benefit of having this kind of interactivity.

Tom Raftery: The obvious question that comes to mind then is, if you are spending all this money on getting carbon out of your system, out of your organization, it must be costing the company a small fortune…

Friday Green Numbers round-up 07/30/2010

Green Numbers
Photo credit Lauren Manning

And here are this week’s Green Numbers:

Symantec’s Sustainability Story: It’s The Power Consumption, Stupid.

symantec commitment

I was lucky enough recently to meet Jose Iglesias, the guy spearheading Symantec’s sustainability efforts. I wrote the interview up over on Monkchips, but much of the content belongs here too. I like Symantec’s clear focus on energy. While others are broadening their sustainability story, Symantec is doubling down on managing energy more effectively, with a plan to take its expertise in reducing IT power consumption and start applying it to broader Smart Grid demand response.

Symantec’s Green IT story is very much an enterprise play and arguably a solid sustainability product strategy could help to increase visibility for some of Symantec’s enterprise tools. Thus for example – Symantec NetBackup PureDisk for storage deduplication could be used to cut the amount of storage and power. One challenge for Symantec is identifying and serving the new buyers in energy reduction. Most of the firm’s traditional practitioner purchasers are not tasked with reducing the energy footprint of the products they manage….

“We sell to admins, but few get compensated on energy savings”

To which I would say… not yet.

Smart Grid as Game Changer

One major opportunity for Symantec to change the account management game there is to parlay its IT experience directly into related spaces such as Smart Grid security and asset management…

Sustainability reporting in tech companies – the hardware vs software divide

Nature's fragility
Photo credit Koshyk

I wrote (and subsequently updated) a post a few weeks ago reviewing the Sustainability Reports of various companies in the technology space.

I updated the review again this afternoon (see the updated review below) with the 2009 reports from IBM, Adobe and SAS.

Something which struck me previously, and which hasn’t changed with the new rankings, is the yawning chasm in attitudes to sustainability reporting between hardware versus software companies.

Obviously this divide has a lot to do with risk – hardware companies who have significant manufacturing facilities, with massively complex supply chains, often containing toxic substances have far more exposure to risk than software companies.

This is reflected in the table below where eight of the top ten listings are hardware companies.

On the other hand, the bottom of the table is all software companies (with the exception of Apple – because they refuse to produce a sustainability report!).

The real odd one out though is the leader, SAP. Their sustainability reporting is out on its own. It is way ahead of any other organisation I have come across and this despite the fact that they are a software company!

One factor may be that they have a significantly European representation in senior management – they have a very different thought process when it comes to sustainability. SAP say they want to be an exemplar and an enabler – and, so far, they seem to be delivering on that.

None of the other software companies seem to take sustainability reporting anywhere nearly as seriously as the hardware companies.

Why do you think that is?

Adobe seems to have no commitment whatsoever to Sustainability

Adobe
Photo credit midiman

I was extremely lucky to be given a tour of Adobe’s triple platinum LEED certified HQ in Palo Alto last year. I video’d highlights of the tour and posted them here. At the time I was extremely impressed with Adobe’s sustainability initiatives.

However, since then I have been more and more convinced that the building is a one-off and that Adobe has no commitment whatsoever, to Sustainability.

Why do I say this?

  1. Adobe’s 2009 CSR report, while slightly better than its 2008 report, it is still a triumph of style over content. There is no adherence to GRI reporting standards, no external audit and no mention of targets set or previous targets reached
  2. No-where on the Adobe site or in its CSR reports (that I could find) does it mention who in the organisation has responsibility for Sustainability. If no-one has overall responsibility for it, then we shouldn’t be surprised if it doesn’t get done
  3. Adobe’s LiveCycle Enterprise Suite gets a passing mention in the 2009 CSR report when it says:

Global telco’s sustainability reports reviewed

Nature's fragility
Photo credit WTL photos

When I published my review of tech company sustainability reports a couple of weeks back, it was suggested that I should add in telco’s as well. Instead, for clarity, I decided to publish a separate review of telco sustainability reports here.

Company Latest Report Format Remarks External Audit GRI Index CEO involved
BT 2009 Online and PDF Granular links and multiple PDF download options Yes Yes – A+ Rated Yes
Telefonica 2009 PDF Comprehensive document with lots of charts and numbers (Spanish only) Yes Yes – A+ Rated President
T-Mobile 2009-10 PDF In an otherwise good report, it was disappointing to see the Chairman’s involvement was a cut & paste of an online discussion he had about sustainability on another site as opposed to something specific to the report. Also, the fact that it contained a photo of the Chair using bottled waste doesn’t speak well for his commitment to sustainability Limited Yes – A+ Rated Chairman – kind of!
Swisscom 2009 Website Very confusing layout. Very difficult to find any meaningful information No Yes – A Rated No
Vodafone 2009 PDF Very comprehensive PDF only report Yes Yes – B+ Rated Yes
Orange 2009 PDF Very comprehensive PDF only report Yes Yes – B+ Rated Yes
China Mobile 2009 PDF China Mobile is the 1st mainland Chinese co. listed on the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes and the thoroughness of this report is a testament to that (in English) No Yes Yes
Telecom Italia 2009 PDF Excellent report with the information well presented and hugely transparent (wrt objectives achieved, objectives missed and targets) Yes Yes Yes
Verizon 2009-10 PDF Good supporting website and report but let down by lack of GRI adherence and no external auditing No No Yes
SK Telecom 2008 PDF Download procedure for PDF is not straightforward and commitment to produce 2009 report by May 2010 has not been met. Also the report is short on numbers and more especially targets. Yes Yes – B+ Rated Yes
AT&T 2008 PDF with options to download individual sections Nicely laid out with goals, numbers and pretty pictures! A very good report – a shame it was only to GRI level C and not externally assured. No Yes C Rated Yes
Telenor No date Online Telenor have a CR section on their site. This section is light on numbers, specifics and targets. No No No
3 (owned by Hutchinson Whampoa) n/a n/a No Environmental or Sustainability site I could find n/a n/a n/a

Some points to note from the review:

Tech company sustainability reports reviewed

Corporate Social Responsibility
Original photo by ATIS547

I was asked on Twitter recently where to find a list of links to tech companies’ CSR reports.

I didn’t know where to find one, so I built one and as well as just the links, I also added in a few extra observations I noted about the reports.

Company Latest Report Format Remarks External Audit GRI Index CEO involved
SAP 2009 Online with downloadable data Highly interactive, includes social media, video & ability to comment inline Independently audited by KPMG Yes – A+ Rated Yes
BT 2009 Online and PDF Granular links and multiple PDF download options Yes Yes – A+ Rated Yes
Intel 2009 PDF custom builder High level of granularity No Yes – A Rated Yes
Dell 2009 PDF Very detailed document – v little detail on website No Yes – B Rated Yes
HP 2009 Online with PDF download Granular links, some videos & interactivity Some, yes Yes Yes
Cisco 2009 Mostly PDF’s with some info available on web Lots of good videos Some Yes Yes
Sony 2009 Online and PDF Comprehensive report No Yes Yes
Microsoft 2009 PDF Lacks necessary detail No No Yes
Nokia 2008 Online No obvious link to a downloadable report Some, yes No No
Logica 2008 Online and PDF Comprehensive report No Yes Yes
IBM 2008 Online with PDF download Granular links & Social Media options No Yes Yes
Adobe 2008 Online and PDF Lots of pretty pictures but light on text No No Yes
CA 2008 PDF CA’s first sustainability report – good 1st effort No Yes – C Rated Yes
SAS 2008 PDF Good PDF report badly left down by poor supporting website No Yes – C Rated Yes
Oracle 2008 PDF Summary of 2009 report available but full report still not out No No President
Apple None
Amazon None
Google None

As previously reported here…

Friday Green Numbers round-up 04/23/2010

Green numbers
Photo credit Unhindered by Talent

And here is this week’s Green numbers:

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

by-sa