Supply Chain Opportunities in Times of Uncertainty: Insights from CEO Greg Price of Shipwell

I am excited to share that on my latest podcast episode, I had the pleasure of speaking with Greg Price, CEO of Shipwell. We discussed a range of topics related to the current state and future of the supply chain industry.

One of the key takeaways from our conversation was the importance of strong leadership in navigating the uncertain and rapidly-changing landscape of the industry. Greg emphasized that in times of economic uncertainty and recession, it’s crucial to take a step back and look at the bigger picture in order to identify opportunities and drive positive outcomes.

Another highlight of our conversation was the discussion on the role of technology in the supply chain. Greg shared insights on how Shipwell is using cutting-edge technology to streamline operations and improve efficiency for their clients. He also highlighted the importance of data and analytics in making informed decisions and staying ahead of the competition.

We also touched on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the supply chain and the ways in which it has accelerated the adoption of digital solutions. Greg shared his thoughts on how the industry will continue to evolve post-pandemic and the opportunities that lie ahead.

My 5 key takeaways from this episode:

  1. Strong leadership is crucial for success in the supply chain industry, especially during recessionary and inflationary environments.
  2. It is important to take a step back and assess areas and elements in the supply chain that need to be focused on in order to drive positive outcomes.
  3. In order to stay competitive and ensure job security, it is important to continuously drive impact and results in the supply chain.
  4. Cost efficiency and future-proofing are key areas to focus on in order to optimize supply chain performance.
  5. Collaboration and open communication with peers and superiors is vital in order to drive progress and success in the supply chain industry.

Overall, it was an enlightening conversation and I believe our listeners will find it incredibly valuable. I encourage you to give it a listen and let me know your thoughts.

I also want to thank Greg for taking the time to speak with me and for sharing his valuable insights. If you are interested in learning more about Shipwell or connecting with Greg, you can reach him at greg@shipwell.com or visit their website at shipwell.com.

And remember to follow and support the podcast, as I will continue to bring you valuable content and expert guests in the field of supply chain.

Image credit: Word Cloud by Epic Top 10

Climate Solutions on the Farm: How eAgronom’s platform is revolutionising sustainable agriculture

Agriculture is one of the most critical industries when it comes to climate change. Not only does it play a major role in producing the food we rely on, but it also impacts our environment and natural resources in countless ways. This is why it’s so important to have a conversation about sustainable and responsible agricultural practices, and that’s exactly what the latest episode of my Climate Confident podcast aims to do.

In this latest episode, I had the pleasure of speaking with Robin Saluoks, CEO of eAgronom. In this episode, we delve into the world of sustainable farming and how technology can play a vital role in reducing emissions in the agricultural industry.

Robin shared with us how his family’s organic grain farm in Estonia prompted him to develop eAgronom, a tool for farmers to manage their operations, including financial reporting and people management. But as time passed, the tool evolved to include carbon and greenhouse gas tracking, as it’s crucial for farmers to consider the environmental impact of their decisions.

One of the key takeaways from the episode is the importance of precision in farming. Robin explains how precision fertilization and precision farming can lead to more efficient use of resources, and ultimately lower emissions. He also touched on the benefits farmers can receive by implementing sustainable practices, such as carbon credit income and sustainable loans with lower interest rates.

Another interesting topic we discussed is the role of food companies and land owners in promoting sustainable farming. Robin mentioned how some food companies are starting to offer a premium for food grown with lower emissions, and how some land owners are offering reduced rental rates to farmers who adopt sustainable practices.

Overall, this episode provides valuable insights into how technology and sustainable practices can benefit both farmers and the environment. If you’re interested in learning more about sustainable farming and the role of technology in reducing emissions, be sure to listen to this episode and follow the Climate Confident podcast for more updates and discussions on this and all Climate topics.

As a reminder, I release a new episode every Wednesday, and you can find it on the Climate Confident website, and in all podcast apps.

Photo credit Beyond Coal & Gas Image Library

Streamlining Supply Chain Issue Resolution with Riptide’s Three-Way Text Platform

In today’s episode of the Digital Supply Chain podcast I had the pleasure of speaking with Doug Marinaro, the CEO and co-founder of Riptide, a three-way text platform for issue resolution.

Doug shared the story of how Riptide came about, starting from the simple idea that a lot of problems could be solved before they become failures if the right people come together in a conversation. He and his co-founder, a small businessman in San Francisco, had previously been applying messaging to his auto repair and towing businesses, and saw dramatic improvements in his ability to satisfy customers. From there, they decided to expand this concept of messaging to be applied more broadly in the context of business and transactions.

Doug went on to explain that Riptide is different from consumer messaging apps like WhatsApp or Telegram, as it allows businesses to have control over who’s in the conversation, where the information about the conversation goes, and the conversation workflow. This allows businesses to automate the conversation and also give the people responsible for the success of that service, the ability to control the conversation and the participants.

Riptide is currently being used in roadside service, delivery, field service, and home services. Doug shared an example of last mile delivery, as this is where Riptide’s solution applies the most. He highlighted that the intersection of instant gratification with complexity is where Riptide’s solution is most valuable, as customers have an expectation of getting an answer immediately and getting their delivery instantly, but the process of actually accomplishing that delivery can be complex and difficult to manage. Riptide’s solution allows businesses to have control over the customer journey, and to have the right participants in the conversation at the right moment, which ultimately leads to a positive end-to-end customer experience.

Doug also discussed Riptide’s expansion plans, and how the solution can be used globally. He mentioned that Riptide is currently only available in North America, but they are talking to customers all around the world who have heard about what they’re doing and the universality of this problem. The good news is that the telecom services that they work with are robust and global, which will allow them to rapidly expand into other countries.

Riptide is a web-based app, so there’s nothing that needs to be installed on your computers, and it allows for the consumer to use the messaging app that’s already on their phones. This makes it easy for businesses to integrate Riptide into their ecosystem, and to provide real-time visibility on every conversation that’s happening. This data is collected and can be mined, and Riptide generates dashboards on usage by different parties, on response rates, and on how long it takes a person to read a message. This data can also be used for dispute resolution and to apply machine learning models that will allow businesses to insert chatbots into the conversation.

Overall, Riptide would appear to be a valuable solution for businesses looking to have control over the customer journey and to ensure a positive end-to-end customer experience. Tune in to the episode to learn more and to hear Doug’s insights on how Riptide can help your business.

And of course, be sure to follow the Digital Supply Chain podcast in your podcast app of choice to stay up-to-date on the latest trends and best practices in Supply Chain.

Photo credit Sarah Marriage on Flickr

Maximize your Supply Chain Industry Exposure with my Podcast Sponsorship Packages

I am delighted to announce that my Digital Supply Chain podcast – the number one podcast showcasing thought leadership, and best practices in Supply Chain is now offering sponsorship packages for companies looking to gain exposure to my highly engaged audience.

As a twice-weekly podcast that focuses on the latest trends and developments in the supply chain industry, I have built a strong following of professionals in the field. With over 240,000 total downloads, and a number 1 ranking on Google and other major search engines for the search term “supply chain podcast,” I believe that these sponsorship packages are a great opportunity for companies to establish themselves as thought leaders in the industry.

My sponsorship packages include:

  1. The ability to brand episodes as “The Digital Supply Chain podcast – this episode sponsored by [sponsor company name]”
  2. The opportunity for the sponsor to choose the guest for the podcast
  3. A full transcription of the episode (this is extremely useful for accessibility, search engine optimisation, and for subsequent write-ups of the episode)
  4. Podcast show notes including links to websites, social media accounts for the sponsor
  5. A comprehensive blog post summarising the episode
  6. An audiogram for each episode with a soundbite from the podcast to be shared with the sponsor
  7. Embed code for each episode to be shared with the sponsor
  8. Three tweets and Mastodon posts per episode containing the audiogram and a link to the episode
  9. A LinkedIn post with the episode highlights, the audiogram, and a link to the episode

We understand that every company is unique, which is why I am happy to work with you to create a sponsorship package that fits your specific needs and budget. Prices for the packages are available on application.

If you’re interested in having your brand associated with the leading Supply Chain podcast, learning more about these sponsorship packages and how I can help your company gain exposure and establish yourself as a thought leader in the supply chain industry, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Climate Solutions in Action: An In-Depth Look at Tradewater’s Efforts to Combat Greenhouse Gases

The latest episode of my Climate Confident Podcast features a conversation with Tim Brown, the CEO of Tradewater. Tradewater is a company that is focused on collecting, controlling, and destroying greenhouse gases with the goal of making the biggest impact possible, as fast as possible.

During the podcast, Tim explains that as a mission-driven company, Tradewater is particularly interested in non-CO2 gases, which are short-lived climate pollutants that do their damage early on when they are released. The gases that Tradewater is currently focusing on include old refrigerants that are up to 10,900 times as potent as CO2, and methane from abandoned and orphaned oil and gas wells that are leaking methane into the atmosphere.

Tim also discussed the scale of the issue, with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently estimating that there are 9 billion metric tons of CO2 equivalent from these gases scattered around the world, most of them already in appliances, foams, building insulation, and other applications. On the HCFCs, which are lower in their global warming potential emissions factor, there are 5 billion metric tons of those gases deployed around the world.

Trade Water’s current goal is to reach a new baseline of 3 million metric tons per year, starting in 2023 and by 2028, they hope to have done 20 million tons of impact. Tim also shared that one of the most interesting aspects of their work has been the global dimension of it and how it has put them in contact with many interesting people around the world. They are always looking for partners and people who are knowledgeable about where these gases may exist, and they have done projects and are working in Honduras, Dominican Republic, Chile, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain, Zimbabwe, Egypt, Thailand and also have intentions to evaluate about 16 more countries this year.

One of the key takeaways from the podcast is that these gases are fungible in the atmosphere and collecting, controlling, and destroying them will benefit everyone. The global nature of this work highlights the magnitude of this problem, but it also presents an opportunity to work in a global context and bring this work up to scale.

The conversation with Tim was both informative and inspiring. It’s clear that Tradewater is making a significant impact in the fight against climate change, and I encourage listeners to check out the full episode to learn more about the work that they are doing. If you’re interested in learning more about the company or connecting with Tim, you can visit their website at tradewater.us or find him on LinkedIn.

And of course, be sure to follow the Climate Confident Podcast to stay up-to-date on the latest developments and solutions in the fight against climate change.

Photo credit FracTracker Alliance on Flickr

The Ultimate Guide to Corporate Climate Action: The Science-Based Targets Initiative

In my latest episode of the Climate Confident podcast, I had the pleasure of interviewing Luiz Amaral, the CEO of the Science-Based Targets Initiative (SBTI). The SBTI is a global body that works to enable businesses to set ambitious emissions reductions targets that align with what climate science tells us is necessary. It’s a truly innovative partnership between several organizations, including the United Nations Global Compact, WWF, World Resources Institute, CDP and Women in Business Coalition.

The SBTI was born out of a realization that there needed to be a way to standardize what “good” looks like for corporate climate action, so that progress could be evaluated and compared. The organization’s goal is to support companies on their path towards a net zero future.

One of the things that I found most fascinating about the SBTI is their use of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol guidelines. This means that the SBTI takes into account other gases besides carbon, such as methane, in determining emissions reductions targets. This comprehensive approach is crucial in the fight against climate change.

Another great thing about the SBTI is that it is a not-for-profit organization. While there is a fee for submitting and validating targets, the real financial decision-making comes from developing and implementing a plan. This makes the SBTI accessible to companies of all sizes and locations.

Lastly, the SBTI has a robust accountability system in place. Companies are required to resubmit their targets every five years and reevaluate their progress. In addition, the SBTI also conducts third-party assessments based on public information. This ensures that companies are held accountable and are making progress towards their ambitious goals.

Overall, the SBTI is a powerful and innovative organization that is making a real difference in the fight against climate change. I encourage all businesses to get involved and make use of the resources and support the SBTI has to offer. It’s time for us all to take action and meet the challenge of the climate crisis head on. I also encourage you to check out the over 100 previous episodes of the Climate Confident podcast and Follow this podcast in your podcast app of choice (Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Overcast, etc.) to get even more compelling climate-related information and insights from experts in the field.

5 Ways to Make Your Supply Chain More Sustainable

As the world becomes more digitized, companies are under increasing pressure to improve the sustainability of their supply chains. Here are 5 ways to make your supply chain more sustainable, from using artificial intelligence to increasing visibility.

  1. Use AI to stay ahead of emissions regulations.
    As climate change continues to be a pressing global issue, emissions regulations are only going to become more strict. Use artificial intelligence to stay up-to-date on the latest emissions regulations and ensure that your company is compliant. AI can also help you identify ways to reduce your emissions and improve your overall sustainability.
  2. Increase visibility into your supply chain.
    Visibility is key to managing a sustainable supply chain. You need to know where your materials are coming from, how they’re being produced, and where they’re going after they leave your facility. By tracking this information, you can make changes to reduce your carbon footprint and improve overall sustainability.
  3. Make sustainability a priority for suppliers.
    Sustainability should be a key criteria when choosing suppliers. Working with supplier who share your commitment to sustainability will help you further reduce your carbon footprint and have a positive impact on the environment.
  4. Invest in renewable energy sources.
    Investing in renewable energy sources is a great way to reduce the carbon footprint of your supply chain. Solar and wind power are becoming increasingly cost-effective, so now is the time to make the switch! Not only will this help the environment, but it will also save you money in the long run.
  5. Educate employees on sustainability practices.
    Your employees play a big role in making your supply chain more sustainable. Educate them on best practices and encourage them to come up with new ideas on how to improve sustainability throughout the entire organization. Creating a culture of sustainability will help facilitate lasting change that benefits both the environment and the bottom line!


There’s no question that sustainability is important for businesses today. But with so many different aspects of supply chain management to consider, it can be difficult to know where to start! By following these 5 tips, you can make your supply chain more sustainable and better prepared for the future!

If you’d like to know more about supply chains and sustainability, don’t forget to check out my Digital Supply Chain podcast – the number one podcast focussing on the digitisation of supply chains

Photo credit Rab Lawrence

How the Internet of Things Can Make Your Manufacturing Business More Sustainable

The Internet of Things, often abbreviated as IoT, refers to the network of physical devices, vehicles, home appliances, and other items that are embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and connectivity which enable these objects to connect and exchange data.

The Industrial Internet of Things, or IIoT, is a specific application of the Internet of Things that pertains to the manufacturing sector. In recent years, sustainability has become an important issue for manufacturers as consumers increasingly seek out products that have been made sustainably and with minimal impact on the environment.

Fortunately, the IIoT can help manufacturers reduce their environmental impact and become more sustainable. Here’s how:

  1. Collecting Data to Increase Visibility and Transparency Across the Value Chain
    The first step to becoming more sustainable is to have visibility and transparency across the entire value chain. This means understanding where your raw materials come from, how they are sourced, how they are used in your manufacturing process, what happens to your finished products after they are sold, etc. In order to gain this visibility and transparency, manufacturers must collect data at every stage of the value chain. This data can be collected manually or automatically through sensors and other digital technologies. Once this data is collected, it can be analyzed to identify areas where your company can become more efficient and reduce waste.
  1. Connecting Machines to Improve Efficiency
    One way that manufacturers can use the IIoT to become more sustainable is by connecting their machines together in order to improve efficiency. For example, if one machine is idling while another machine is overloaded, this presents an opportunity to optimize production by redistributing work among the machines. By connecting machines together and using data analytics to optimize production in this way, manufacturers can avoid wasting energy and resources.
  2. Using Renewable Energy Sources
    Another way that manufacturers can use the IIoT to become more sustainable is by using renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power instead of traditional sources such as coal or natural gas. While renewable energy sources may have been more expensive in the past, advances in technology have led to a decrease in cost while simultaneously increasing efficiency. As a result, many manufacturers are making the switch to renewable energy sources in order to reduce their environmental impact.
  3. Implementing Predictive Maintenance Schedules
    Predictive maintenance is a type of maintenance that is performed before problems occur. This is in contrast to traditional preventive maintenance which is performed on a regular schedule whether or not problems exist. By using predictive maintenance schedules based on data collected by sensors, manufacturers can avoid unexpected downtime due to equipment failures. In addition, predictive maintenance can help extend the lifespan of equipment which leads to fewer replacement cycles and less waste over time.

The IIoT offers many opportunities for manufacturers to become more sustainable businesses. By collecting data across the value chain, connecting machines together for improved efficiency, using renewable energy sources wherever possible, and implementing predictive maintenance schedules; manufacturers can reduce their environmental impact while simultaneously improving their bottom line. As consumers increasingly seek out sustainable products, there has never been a better time for manufacturers to take advantage of these opportunities presented by the IIoT .

How IoT Helps Fight Climate Change


The internet of things, or “IoT,” is a system of connected devices that share data and work together to achieve a common goal. By 2025, it’s estimated that there will be 75 billion IoT devices in use worldwide. That represents a major opportunity to reduce carbon emissions and make our economy more sustainable. Here’s how IoT is already reducing carbon emissions, and how it can do even more in the future.

Monitoring and reducing energy usage: One of the most direct ways IoT is reducing carbon emissions is by monitoring and reducing energy usage. Connected devices can track everything from how much electricity a building is using to how much water a factory is consuming. This data can be used to make real-time adjustments that result in significant reductions in energy usage. In some cases, these reductions can be as much as 30%.

Improving transportation: Another way IoT is reducing carbon emissions is by improving transportation. Connected devices can be used to optimize shipping routes and traffic patterns. This results in fewer vehicles on the road and less congestion. Additionally, IoT can be used to develop new alternative fuel sources like electric vehicles.

Increasing green energy use: In addition to reducing energy consumption, IoT can also be used to increase the use of renewable energy sources. For example, wind turbines and solar panels can be outfitted with sensors that allow them to adjust their output based on real-time conditions. This ensures that they’re always operating at maximum efficiency, which reduces the need for traditional (and emitting) forms of energy generation.

IoT presents a major opportunity to reduce carbon emissions and make our economy more sustainable. By monitoring energy usage, improving transportation, and increasing green energy use, IoT is already having a positive impact on the environment. As the number of connected devices continues to grow, so too will the potential for even greater reductions in carbon emissions.

If you’d like to know more about successful climate emissions reduction strategies, don’t forget to check out my weekly Climate 21 podcast. With roughly 100 episodes published, you’ll be sure to find lots of learnings there.

How much cheaper is it to drive an electric vehicle than an internal combustion engine one?

“How much does it cost to drive an Electric Vehicle?” and “How much cheaper is it to drive an Electric Vehicle than a petrol/diesel car?”

Those are two questions I get asked a lot and it’s not as easy to answer as you might think. Why? Well, it depends on two main factors

  1. the price of the fuel (electricity/petrol/diesel) in your area and
  2. the fuel efficiency of the vehicle we’re talking about

2008 Toyota Prius2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh
Price of Fuel (per kWh or litre)€1.30€0.09
Fuel efficiency5.5l/100km6km/kWh
Cost per km€0.0715€0.015
Cost for 10,000km a year€715€150

From 2008 to 2018 I drove a Toyota Prius and it used to get around 5.5l/100km (42.8mpg), and petrol here in Spain costs around €1.30 per litre (roughly $5.93 per gallon). I drove an average 10,000km (6,000 miles) a year so that cost me about €715 in petrol expenses alone (ignoring oil changes, maintenance, etc.).

In 2018 I traded in the Prius for a Nissan Leaf 40kWh. The Leaf can drive 6.25km per kWh of energy in the battery. If we round that down to 6km to make the calculations easier (and to be a little conservative), then because our night rate electricity costs €0.09/kWh, that gives us a cost per km of €0.015 and a total of €150 for the full year’s 10,000km.

Of course, I plug the Leaf in to charge often during the day when the sun is shining so as to take advantage of the “free” electricity being generated by our solar panels, so the figure of €150 is much higher than I pay in reality.

And then there is the issue of maintenance. I didn’t keep a record of how much maintenance I paid for the annual maintenance for the Prius, but when I took delivery of the Leaf the first maintenance scheduled in the Maintenance Manual was at 30,000km. Electric vehicles require far less maintenance than internal combustion engines.

These were my costs. Substitute in your own local costs to see how much you would save by switching your car to an electric one (if you haven’t already!).